Public GeoRisQ Monitor Maps

LGBT Military Index

The LGBT Military Index maps the situation of LGBT participation in the armed forces on a global scale. Every country in the world implements a different combination of policies based on inclusion, admission, tolerance, exclusion, and persecution. Based on these combinations, every armed force can be estimated and ranked to compare countries. The LGBT Military Index ranks militaries, with the most inclusive scoring highest. The color scale indicates how countries scored: the brighter the pink on our map, the higher the country scores in our index and the more inclusive its military is. Likewise, the lower a country scores in our index, the darker is its color. In countries that are colored black, LGBT people may face persecution.

Drivers of Vulnerability Monitor

The Hague Centre for Strategic Studies (HCSS) is proud to present the Drivers of Vulnerability (DoV) Monitor, a 21st century tool to explore our 21st century security environment. The DoV Monitor contains over 50 drivers of state vulnerability to intrastate conflict for around 200 countries from over twenty years.It combines the expertise of decades of conflict research with a data driven approach, presented in one interactive interface.

The DoV Monitor is set up to allow end users to explore the vulnerability of states from a multitude of angles. It can display data on a global and a regional level, allowing users to assess both general trends and patterns of vulnerability in specific regions or countries over time. It also provides summaries of the existing academic literature on the drivers of vulnerability. End users can create their own composite indices and export maps and graphs to be used in presentations and reports. This makes it a powerful research tool, enabling policymakers & pundits, scholars & students, and everyone else taking a keen interest in their security environment to explore the intricacies of intrastate conflict.

Shades of Graying Monitor

The effects of aging on our societies and economies come in many shades. Living longer in better health is clearly a sign of success. However, while some sectors of the economy are set to profit from a graying population, aging also poses certain grand challenges, most notably in the form of rising public expenditure.

This Shades of Graying monitor maps the economic impact of aging on our societies from 2010 to 2050. Split into two parts, it first visualizes worldwide data of Old-age Dependency Ratios and then provides detailed projections of the impact of aging on public expenditure. This monitor has a central focus on Europe, examining in-depth the projected aging-related expenditure changes on pensions, long-term care, health care, unemployment benefits and education.

Climate Change Vulnerability Monitor

Climate change is arguably the largest environmental challenge facing humankind. If it continues unabated it will very likely cause tremendous damages to infrastructure, lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths from floods, heat waves, malnutrition, vector borne diseases and trigger the extinction of many species. Climate change related risks can easily become even more disastrous if certain tipping points in the climate system are crossed. Many countries around the world will be affected in one way or the other.

This Climate Change Vulnerability Monitor assesses global variations in vulnerability to climate change on the basis of a simple country level Index which gauges vulnerability to three main potential impacts of global warming: (i) Increase in weather-related disasters; (ii) Sea level rise; and (iii) Loss of agricultural productivity.

This GeoRisQ Monitor has been developed within the context of the report Innovation in a Warming World. This report is part of the Strategy & Change project ‘Grand Challenges’, which aims to identify the most pressing future challenges for Europe, and looks at how research and development can help us to better cope with these challenges.

To access the Climate Change Vulnerability Monitor, please click on Go To This GeoRisQ Monitor. To read our analysis, please click on Download Report. For more information on our method and sources, click Download More Info.

Food Safety Performance Monitor

Our GeoRisQ 'Food Safety Performance Monitor' aims to assess the performance of EU countries in effectively preventing food-borne illness. Food in the European Union has never been safer. We have never had such advanced systems protecting us against food safety risks. Europe has some of the lowest rates of known food-borne illnesses in the world. Despite this, biological, chemical, allergenic and physical hazards are still present. Some countries perform somewhat better than others in mitigating these risks.

The GeoRisQ ‘Food Safety Performance Monitor’ assesses the food safety performance of European countries based on the following four indicators: (i) outbreaks of food-borne disease, (ii) certifications of good practices within the food industry, (iii) pro-active approach to notifying food safety issues to the European Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed, and (iv) food imported from outside the European Union.

This GeoRisQ Monitor has been developed within the context of the report From Farm to Fork and Further. This report is part of the Strategy & Change project ‘Grand Challenges’, which aims to identify the most pressing future challenges for Europe, and looks at how research and development can help us to better cope with these challenges.

To access the GeoRisQ Monitor Map, please click on Go To This GeoRisQ Monitor. To read our analysis of this Monitor's results, please click on Download Report. For more information on our method and sources, click Download More Info.

Maladies of Prosperity

Many of our major health problems in Europe are the price we pay for progress. While the current status of health remains alarming in regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, Europeans in particular have experienced a steady improvement in health and living conditions over the past century: we are healthier, richer and live longer lives than ever before. Yet despite these achievements, a series of health problems continue to threaten our future wellbeing: the so-called ‘Maladies of Prosperity’. These maladies predominantly appear in the form of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and include diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and mental disorders.

The GeoRisQ Monitor ‘Maladies of Prosperity’ shows the challenges to public health that affect European countries (EU-27 + Norway + Switzerland). It does so by taking a closer look at how these countries fare with respect to three major underlying drivers and behavioral risk factors of NCDs, namely: Unhealthy Lifestyles, Aging, and Environmental Degradation.

To access the Monitor ‘Maladies of Prosperity’, please click on Go To This GeoRisQ Monitor. To read our analysis, please click on Download Report. For more information on our method and sources, click Download More Info.

Note: The Monitor ‘Maladies of Prosperity’ is a preview of a general ‘Health Monitor’ that will accompany the forthcoming report ‘Taking Care of our Health: Future Health Challenges in Europe’, published within the joint HCSS/TNO Strategy & Change program.

Frustrating A European Generation - UPDATE JULY 2012

This updated Youth Frustration Monitor assesses the likelihood of socio-political instability across the European continent based on most recent available data. It considers the combination of youth unemployment, income inequality and public debt of European countries. Large scale demonstrations in Southern European countries against democratically elected governments have been a recurring phenomenon in recent months. They result directly from widespread resentment against governmental austerity policies, especially amongst the younger cohorts of the populations. These cohorts are often most heavily affected by the current situation, with skyrocketing levels of youth unemployment amidst increasing levels of socio-economic inequality. Their future prospects, moreover, are bleak, as exploding public debt leaves governments ill equipped to kick-start economic growth. The ensuing social and political instability in these countries should therefore not come as a surprise. With this in mind, we assess the likelihood of future socio-political instability for countries across the European continent.

To access the updated GeoRisQ Monitor, please click on Go To This GeoRisQ Monitor. For more information on our method and sources, click Download More Info.

Humanitarian Catastrophes

Societies with high levels of food dependencies are particularly vulnerable to sudden disruptions in the supply of food. Such disruptions are likely to appear during the direct aftermath of a natural disaster. In the absence of an effective government capable of coping with the disaster’s consequences, this may produce famine and dislocation of the population in addition to widespread socio-political unrest. Societies with high levels of food dependency, significant vulnerabilities to natural disasters, and ineffective governments, are therefore at greater risk of a humanitarian catastrophe.

To assess which countries are at greater risk, we have created a ‘Humanitarian Catastrophe Monitor’. To access the Monitor, please click on Go To This GeoRisQ Monitor. To read our analysis, please click on Download Report. For more information on our method and sources, click Download More Info.

Frustrating a European Generation

Large scale demonstrations in Southern European countries against democratically elected governments have been a recurring phenomenon in recent months. They result directly from widespread resentment against governmental austerity policies, especially amongst the younger cohorts of the populations. These cohorts are often most heavily affected by the current situation, with skyrocketing levels of youth unemployment amidst increasing levels of socio-economic inequality. Their future prospects, moreover, are bleak, as exploding public debt leaves governments ill equipped to kick-start economic growth. The ensuing social and political instability in these countries should therefore not come as a surprise. With this in mind, we assessed the likelihood of future socio-political instability for countries across the European continent.


To access this month's GeoRisQ Monitor Map, please click on Go To This GeoRisQ Monitor. To read our analysis, please click on Download Report. For more information on our method and sources, click Download More Info.

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